Past Events

2018 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium 
July 22, 2018, Valencia, Spain, Open Data Cube Workshop - The IGARSS Data Cube Workshop is intended to introduce the Open Data Cube (ODC) to users and provide hands-on training on the use of the data and approaches for applying application algorithms to produce relevant products for decision-making. Learn more>>
2018 Africa Regional Data Cube (ARDC) Workshop 
May  9 - 11, 2018, Nairobi, Kenya - The African Regional Data Cube Workshop is intended to introduce the Open Data Cube (ODC) to local users in 5 African countries: Kenya, Tanzania, Ghana, Sierra Leon, Senegal. Learn more>>
2nd ODC Conference
February 12-16, 2018, Canberra, Australia
The ODC will come together for its 2nd Conference 12-16 February 2018 in Canberra, where Developer, Partners, and joint threads will be organised. Learn more>>  
GEO-XIV Plenary
October 23-27, 2017, Washington D.C.
Over 700 people from diverse geographies, sectors and technical areas came together in Washington, DC, to explore the use and applications of Earth observations for the benefit of humankind. ODC was featured in multiple sessions. Learn more>>  
August 22nd, 2017
CEOS WGISS Technology Exposition Webinar
"Open Data Cube and Jupyter Notebooks with a focus on Burgeoning Role of Python for Earth Observation Data Analysis" - Syed Rizvi (CEOS SEO)

ABSTRACT: The Python programming language has many advantages as a tool for scientific computing, remote sensing, and machine learning. In fact, Python is one of the most popular programming languages for research in these fields, even though it was not created with these applications in mind. The major advantages that make Python a great fit for scientific computing and remote sensing are its extensive standard library and selection of add-on packages, its readability, its ease of programming compared to other languages, and the great quantity of help resources easily found online. This talk will focus on the use of the Jupyter notebook that allows developers to parse their code into blocks which can be run independently of each other, with variables stored in the background. Dividing the code up in this way can save vast amounts of time while developing a program, as it allows developers to test their code a few lines at a time, without running other lengthy processes included in the program. As an example, for the water classification application that we have recently developed, we have used a Jupyter notebook to prevent the need to load a new Data Cube or retrain a machine learning algorithm every time we needed to check the output of a smaller function within the program. Using a Jupyter notebook certainly saved us large number of hours over the course of the development process. We will demos some of the interesting Open Data Cube Jupyter notebooks that we have recently developed.

WGISS (the Working Group on Information Systems and Services) is a subsidiary body supporting CEOS. WGISS promotes collaboration in the development of systems and services that manage and supply these observatory data.

Please see the workshop materials here >>

July 23rd-28th, 2017
IGARSS Conference 2017
July 7th, 2017
CEOS WGISS Technology Exposition Webinar
"Open Data Cubes" - Dr. Robert Woodcock (CSIRO), Dr.Brian Killough (CEOS SEO)

ABSTRACT: Recent work by WGISS members has been fleshing out the concept of Data Cubes to enable analysis of large Earth Observation data sets. Please join us as Rob Woodcock of CSIRO (Australia) and Brian Killough of the CEOS System Engineering Office provide an introduction to Data Cubes. Rob will set the stage for Data Cubes with user needs, key features and basic high-level architecture, followed by Brian to talk about some more of the inner workings of Data Cubes.- Dr. Brian Killough, Dr. Robert Woodcock

WGISS (the Working Group on Information Systems and Services) is a subsidiary body supporting CEOS.

WGISS promotes collaboration in the development of systems and services that manage and supply these observatory data.